DVD Formats

DVD-R Duplication:

The data contained on your master disc is burned (duplicated) onto blank DVD-R discs. With smaller quantities, this is the most effective and cost efficient way of producing DVD copies. The storage capacity is 4.7GB of data or approximately 2 hours of video.

DVD-5 Replication:

Discs are manufactured by injection moulding, with the data contained on your master transferred during the moulding process. DVD-5 is a single layered disc with a storage capacity of 4.7GB (the same as DVD-R), but DVD-5 replication is a more cost effective way of producing larger quantities of DVD-5. The storage capacity of 4.7GB of data equates approximately to 2 hours of high-quality video.

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DVD-5 Replication Process:

DVD-5 replication commences with the transfer of the data (information) from the Master DVD or DLT supplied by the customer to a Glass Master, from which a quality assured Stamper is "grown" through an electroplating process. The stamper containing the data and a separate dummy stamper (to produce a blank disc) are both used to create the finished 1.2mm optical disc.

The user data stamper is mounted in one of two moulds in the moulding machine and highest-grade polycarbonate granules are introduced, via a hopper, into the injection screw. Here the granules are melted down to produce a moulting liquid plastic. The liquid plastic is then injected into the mould cavity and formed around the protruding pit structure on the stamper. Cooling channels are opened in the mould solidifying the moulting plastic in to a 0.6mm solid polycarbonate disc, containing an exact reverse replica of the stampers pit structure. The dummy stamper placed in the second mould produces a disc for the second layer and this goes through the exact same process to form a blank disc.

The moulded user data disc is now placed in a high-vacuum chamber where a thin coat of aluminium is laid down over the pit surfaces in a process known as metalising. Metalising forms the reflective surface of the optical disc, without which the laser in the DVD player would be unable to reflect the pit structure. A layer of UV lacquer is applied to the metallised side of the data disc and the 0.6mm dummy disc is placed on top; this sandwich of discs, metal and lacquer is passed under a UV-lamp to harden the lacquer and produce a finished 1.2mm bonded disc. The disc then undergoes a physical inspection by camera to ascertain if all the cosmetic criteria are within spec. The approved finished discs are then stacked on a spindle ready for electrical and mechanical off line testing by very stringent quality control procedures. Once approved, the quality assured discs are then ready for printing & packing.

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DVD-9 Replication:

This involves an identical process to DVD-5 replication, except that DVD-9 discs are dual layered discs with data on both layers. This is the only effective way of producing dual layered discs which have a storage capacity of 8.4GB of data or approximately 3.5 hours of high quality video.

Show more about DVD 5 Replication »

DVD-9 Replication Process:

DVD-9 replication commences with the transfer of the data (information) from the Master DLTs supplied by the customer to two Glass Masters, from which two quality assured Stampers are "grown" through an electroplating process. The two stampers containing the data are used to create the finished 1.2mm optical disc, which comprises two layers.

Each stamper is mounted in one of two moulds in the moulding machine and highest-grade polycarbonate granules are introduced, via a hopper, into the injection screw. Here the granules are melted down to produce a moulting liquid plastic. The liquid plastic is then injected into the twin mould cavities and formed around the protruding pit structure on each stamper. Cooling channels are opened in the mould solidifying the moulting plastic in to a 0.6mm solid polycarbonate disc, containing an exact reverse replica of the stampers' pit structure.

Each disc is transferred to a high-vacuum chamber where a thin coat of aluminium is laid down over the pit surfaces in a process known as metalising. Metalising forms the reflective surface of the optical disc, without which the laser in the DVD player would be unable to reflect the pit structure. A layer of UV lacquer is applied to the metallised side of both discs

Layer 0 (the nearest layer to the laser beam in the DVD player) is metallised with a silver alloy and Layer 1 (the upper layer) is metallised with aluminium. UV lacquer is now applied between both discs forming a sandwich of discs, metals and lacquer which is passed under a UV-lamp to harden the lacquer and produce a finished 1.2mm bonded optical disc. The completed disc now undergoes a physical inspection by camera to ascertain if all the cosmetic criteria are within spec. The approved discs are then stacked on a spindle ready for electrical and mechanical off-line testing by very stringent quality control procedures. Once approved, the quality assured discs are then ready for printing & packing.

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On-Body Disc Printing

OnBody disc printing is the process of transferring your artwork onto one side of the replicated or duplicated discs. This can vary from simple content text to full colour images and designs. The three most common methods for printing are litho-print, screen-print and ink-jet. Adhesive paper labels are NOT recommended by All Write Media!

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Screen Printing

A screen is made of porous, finely woven fabric (originally silk, but typically made of polyester or nylon) stretched over an aluminum frame. Areas of the screen are blocked off with a non-permeable material - a stencil - which is a positive of the image to be printed; that is, the open spaces are where the ink will appear.

The screen is placed on top of the disc. Ink is introduced to the top of the screen, and a rubber blade(squeegee) squeezes the ink evenly into the screen openings and onto the disc. The ink is dried rapidly using infra-red light before the next colour is transferred.

Silk-screen printing is most effective for one or two spot colours, and is not very successful for full colour.

Litho Printing

Litho printing is a widely used printing technique where the inked image is transferred (or "offset") from a plate to a rubber blanket, then to the printing surface. When used in combination with the lithographic process, which is based on the repulsion of oil and water, the offset technique employs a flat (planographic) image carrier on which the image to be printed obtains ink from ink rollers, while the non-printing area attracts a film of water, keeping the non-printing areas ink-free.

Litho-printing is mainly used for full colour and more complicated designs where the images need to be very clearly defined and gives superb results.

Ink-jet Printing

This is primarily used for short runs of CD and DVDs as set-up time and materials are minimal, thus reducing costs. When using industry-standard ink jet printers, as installed in All Write Media, the quality is excellent on full-colour artwork and photos, however, ink-jet printing is not ideal for spot colours or solid black images.

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